Caught the Bastard……I think


My egg production had dropped precipitously, 3 weeks ago I was collecting a dozen a day then it dropped to only 1 or 2 eggs a day seemingly overnight. For a while I just ignored it thinking that it was the heat. Last weekend it penetrated my thick skull that there were eggshell pieces in the litter inside the coop, I got an Egg Eater!! What to do? 

I rounded up the usual suspects, these three are always malingering in the hen house just looking guilty so Wham! They went into the juvenile pen. What happened? Three eggs in the little pet carrier the quail hide in inside the juvenile pen but only 1 egg in the henhouse and no telltale shells in the litter.

So I targeted the shifty looking ones next. Brian, one of my trusted minions, was sent on a midnight raid to round them up. This group consisted of the remaining three easter eggers. Did this rectify the problem? NO!! All it did was add some green eggs to the daily hoard in the quail box! What to do? Run a sting operation, Thats What!

Yesterday while planting my new fruiting Mulberry Trees, I note “fruiting” here because fruitless Mulberry Trees have been outlawed in Las Vegas, I placed 2 chicken eggs from the quail box into one of the nest boxes in the henhouse. There was also one egg in a nest in the corner of the henhouse that I left alone due to the fact that there was one very angry duck sitting on it. I kept my eye on the bait box, kinda like a bait car for chickens, while doing my chores in the orchard but other than a couple of nosy Nora’s nothing happened. I collected the eggs from the nest box and left the angry duck to her sitting.

This morning I went back up to water my Mulberry Tree’s and Comfrey plants that I set out yesterday. Additionally I had potted up a couple of trimmings from the Mulberry’s and some Oldham Bamboo culms that I am hoping will root that need a drink. When I checked the henhouse the angry duck was gone as was her egg! I looked but couldn’t find any shells around nor did any of the nest boxes contain any eggs. In the juvenile pen were three eggs in the quail box, so i reset the trap just like yesterday. I had a big black sex-link hen that was hovering around watching me, so I made an unsuccessful attempt to catch her but then promptly forgot her. After starting the hose I went up to the house to fill the surge tank and got sucked into fixing the dryer for my sons fiancé.

That took about a half hour and when I got back down to the orchard what do I see? A big black feathered butt stickin out of the baited nest box! Hurrying into the henhouse I grabbed the hen and sure enough it was the same black sex-link, and in the nest box was a freshly pecked open egg.

Now I have a confirmed egg-eater on lockdown in the juvenile pen. Only time will tell if this problem has spread to the other girls in my flock but for now I’m hopeful that the main culprit has been uncovered. If my egg production in the henhouse goes back up this week I plan on releasing the earlier suspects one at a time back into the general population. Those girls ain’t off the hook yet though, they’re gonna have to prove their innocence before a full reprieve from the Santa Ria priest is given! As to the fate of the one I caught red-handed, or should I say yellow-beaked, maybe my minion and I will try our hand at butchering our first chicken. One things for sure she is not going back into my chicken yard!

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13 thoughts on “Caught the Bastard……I think

  1. We have one or more in our flock as well. We’ve put golf balls in their nests. It’s gotten some better, but every so often, we pick up an egg, or a golf ball, with dried yolk on it. It’s tough to break them of that bad habit!

    • Max says:

      Looks like I haven’t caught all of the offenders yet. My son tells me that he found three eggs this evening that had been pecked open. I’m going to put some golf balls in tomorrow.

  2. artsifrtsy says:

    I had no clue that chickens would resort to cannabalism 😦

  3. twintoefarm says:

    Oh- what a little shit. Let me know how the butchering goes if you do it.

  4. Eeek! That is one of the fears of every chicken owner. I only have 3 and they are civilised little ladies (so far). But I hear the creatures can turn to egg eaters at any minute. I grab the eggs shortly after they lay (it’s pretty easy with 3 who all lay almost with Swiss precision) to reduce temptation but apparently one egg broken by accident can cause a hen to investigate – with her beak – and once she realises how yummy an egg tastes, there’s no going back.

    I hope your girls haven’t all learned bad habits and you will be eating souffle’s not chicken soup in the coming weeks.

  5. jdgarner68 says:

    Lol…great story.

  6. Thanks for reading my blog. I learned something new again today so I can count this day a success. Have always been interested in chickens but never had the opportunity to have any. Good story.

  7. patsquared2 says:

    Love this post and love your blog. It’s so nice to know that there are other people in our world who are doing the same things I’m doing! Thanks for enjoying my blog post on “zones.”

  8. Great story I enjoyed it and it made me laugh! I want to start raising chickens but husband won’t agree, we get too attached to animals. Thanks for visiting my blog too.

    • Max says:

      I was impressed by your attitude and what you are doing. A small flock (2 or 3) of a wisely chosen breed could be a perfect addition to your garden. With a little research I’m sure your husband (with a little assistance from you) could build a nice little chicken tractor. A couple of cute little friendly hens in their movable tractor would do a great job of “prepping” an area for your sheet mulching! And when they weren’t on duty prepping a future bed they could be pre-digesting kitchen scraps, weeds, and garden waste into the worlds best compost starter! Finally you would be amazed how just 1 or 2 eggs a day build up!

  9. So glad you found Late Bloomer, cause I’m happy to read your chicken story! There’s just no way, I don’t think, I can manage chickens, though some neighbors nearby each have 3. I had NO idea of this nasty habit of pecking eggs? Who knew? – Kaye

  10. taboodada says:

    Wow, and I thought the land I was working with was unforgiving. For such an Arid property you sure are producing alot. I want to husband rabbits but breeding is outlawed in my State. I’m in a semi-arid climate and the best results are through aquaponics & permaculture. Have you heard of Earth boxes? here’s a link http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EfK-MmsYI2w

  11. […] I got just a tad obsessive about it here on my blog, first in July with my pie in the sky hopes of “Caught the Bastard” continued with “Update Schmupdate” culminating in a little self examination in […]

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